Why Google’s Chairman Says Everybody Needs a Coach

Summer camp registration is now underway so now we at The Campus are pushing forward with our coaching and workshops.

Coaching is a bit ambiguous, especially when it comes to creativity, but I think Eric Schmidt, Google’s chairman and past CEO, hits the nail on the head in his chat with Fortune.

Before I started my silence experiment I had a long chat with a friend who is looking to start her own business. She has a great idea but was struggling with the realities of executing and the details. I reminded her that she had just come up with the idea, that, in fact, she was still in the creation phase where ideas come up and should be written down and enjoyed. The creation phase is not the time for focussing in on the realities but rather the stage at which one should be thinking expansively and without limits. It’s the time to keep every thought and allow time and space for more to bubble up.

It is rare that the first ideas are the ones that we stick with but it is ALWAYS the first ideas that lead to the second, the third and so on. Along that train of thinking will be the gem and if you cut off your flow of ideas with analysis too early then you’ll likely miss the great one you were heading toward.  She responded by telling me that I was the right person to call, that she needed to talk to a coach. I was so very complimented, but it hits on a deep truth.

Through school, sports and childhood we have parents, teachers and others to help encourage us,  help us pick ourselves up when we’re down and to hold a mirror of reality in front of us when we’re caught in our own, sometimes narrow, point of view. As Schmidt says, “One thing that people are never good at is seeing themselves as others see them. A coach really, really helps.”

Creativity coaching does just this, sure it’s hand holding but it’s also exercises and strategies to help you harness the gifts that you might not realize you have. It’s help knowing when to let loose and when to reign in and analyse. Lastly, it can offer clarity about what your creative strengths are and what and how to improve those areas that might need a bit of work.

Here’s what Eric Schmidt, CEO of Google, has to say on the subject…

Eric Schmidt

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